Replace a Block of Text in Vim

Select the block of text:

1. Position the cursor at the beginning of the text you want to replace

2. Press v to enter visual mode. (or upper case V to select whole lines, or Ctrl-v for a vertical block).

3. Move the cursor to the end of the text to be replaced. (While selecting text, you can perform searches and other advanced movement, a feature that sets vim apart from most other editors.)

4. Press c. This deletes the selection and leaves you in insert mode.

5. Type your replacement text.

Selection, Cut, Copy and Paste in Vim

The selection is done in visual mode.

To cut (or copy) and paste using visual selection:

1. Position the cursor at the beginning of the text you want to cut/copy.

2. Press v to begin character-based visual selection (or upper case V to select whole lines, or Ctrl-v for a vertical block).

3. Move the cursor to the end of the text to be cut/copied. (While selecting text, you can perform searches and other advanced movement, a feature that sets vim apart from most other editors.)

4. Press d (as in “delete”) to cut, or y (as in “yank”, which I imagine meaning “yank so hard and fast that it leaves a copy behind”) to copy.

5. Move the cursor to the desired paste location.

6. Press p to paste after the cursor, or P to paste before it.

 

Bonus Tip: To replace the selected text with new text (to be entered by you), press c instead of d or y on step 4. This deletes the selection and leaves you in insert mode. Then, instead of (or prior to) steps 5-6, type your replacement text.

What is Vim Recording?

Recording is a really useful feature of Vim.

You start recording by pressing “Q” key followed by any other letter keystroke, and you can end it by typing “Q” again.

It records everything you type. You can then replay it simply by typing “@“ followed by the letter.

Record search, movement, replacement…

This is one of the best features of Vim.

One more thing to note is that you can hit any number before the “@“ to replay the recording that many times like (100@<letter>) will play your recorded actions 100 times.

How to remote control your PC from outside your home network

Note: Although Our tutorial uses RDP protocol to control Windows PC, the same idea also applies to remote control Mac or Linux with VNC protocol.

Allow Remote Connections on Windows

To access one computer from another, you first need to allow remote connections on the computer you want to access, which must be running one of the following versions of Windows:

Continue reading “How to remote control your PC from outside your home network”

How to hack to change the created and modified date of a file

We can do this trick with a single terminal command.

first dive into the directory where the file is stored.
touch -t YYYYMMDDhhmmss fileName.extension

Done, if the time you entered is before the original created time, both created and modified time would be changed to the new time assigned. However, if the time you entered is after the original created time, only the modified time would be affected.

eg. There is a file, test.doc, on your Desktop. Continue reading “How to hack to change the created and modified date of a file”

Boot argument options in OS X

 

sudo nvram boot-args="iog=0x0"

This reverses the “Clamshell” mode for Apple’s laptop systems, where when you close the display but connect the system to an external monitor and keyboard the system will stay awake. After running this command, when connecting an external monitor, the internal display will be disabled, which can be beneficial in some situations such as those where you are mirroring your desktop but wish to run the external display at a higher resolution than your laptop can run.
To disable these features and have the system boot normally without any extra options, you can erase them from the nvram by either resetting it or, more specifically, by running either of the following commands in the Terminal (these will reset the boot arguments instead of resetting all the nvram variables):

sudo nvram boot-args=""
sudo nvram -d boot-args

For further reading, check out Boot argument options in OS X from CNet to see all options you could operate on NVRAM.